The Enlightenment [Pear Deck] (shared)

A philosophy lesson slide deck about Enlightenment - do we need government? Natural rights, the social contract, main philosophers of the era and other topics.

teaching
teaching materials
philosophy
history
Enlightenment
PearDeck
  1. Home
  2. Google Slide
  3. The Enlightenment [Pear Deck] (shared)

The Enlightenment [Pear Deck] (shared)

A philosophy lesson slide deck about Enlightenment - do we need government? Natural rights, the social contract, main philosophers of the era and other topics.

teaching, teaching materials, philosophy, history, Enlightenment, PearDeck

The Enlightenment

Lesson from iCivics The Enlightenment Mini-Lesson and iCivics Philosophically Correct; Adapted for Pear Deck by Stacy Yung (@stacyyung)

🖍 DRAW: Shade in the Enlightenment period on the timeline.

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

Do we need government?

📝 WRITE: Explain the relationship between the state of nature and social contract and consider why this was such a revolutionary idea.

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Text Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

Natural Rights

Enlightenment thinkers believed that human beings are born with fundamental, basic rights. These natural rights included the right to life, liberty, property, and the freedom to find happiness. In order for people to enjoy these natural rights, other rights needed to be protected. Enlightenment thinkers believed people should have the right to express themselves, to move around freely, and to petition the government.

The Social Contract

If there was no government at all, people would live in a state of nature with no rules and complete freedom—but without any protection from each other. One Enlightenment idea was the social contract: citizens give up some freedom they would have in a state of nature (like the freedom to rob and kill people), and in exchange the government protects citizens’ right to life, liberty, and property. To Enlightenment thinkers, the relationship between a government and its citizens was like an agreement. Citizens agree to obey a set of rules, and the government agrees to protect citizens’ rights.

🖍 HIGHLIGHT Enlightenment thinkers’ beliefs about government.

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

Consent of the Governed

Enlightenment thinkers believed that governments had a responsibility to hold up their end of the social contract. If a government failed, then citizens would no longer agree to be governed and they would have the right to revolt. This idea is known as consent of the governed. Traditionally, a government protected citizens from foreign invaders, but the government also had absolute authority over the people. A king ruled his citizens whether they consented or not. To Enlightenment thinkers, this was unacceptable.

Republicanism

Since the Middle Ages, European leaders had gained power through heredity, or family ties. Kings and queens took the throne after another family member died. The people had no say in this process. Many Enlightenment thinkers believed in republicanism – the idea that a country’s leader should be chosen by the citizens in a general election. Even so, some Enlightenment thinkers frowned on the idea of a democracy. They feared what would happen if a mob of uneducated people had the power to vote.

🖍 HIGHLIGHT Enlightenment thinkers’ beliefs about government.

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

the right to life, liberty, property, and the freedom to find happiness

citizens agree to obey a set of rules, and the government agrees to protect citizens’ rights

no rules and complete freedom—but without any protection from each other

if a gov’t failed, then citizens would no longer agree to be governed and they would have the right to revolt

period of time when people had new ideas about human existence and human rights

the idea that a country’s leader should be chosen by the citizens in a general election

social contract

natural rights

state of nature

republicanism

Enlightenment

consent of the governed

Draw lines to match the word to the definition:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

During the Enlightenment, people developed new ideas about government.

🖍 DRAW or DESCRIBE in the boxes below to reflect the different ideas about government.

How government worked before the Enlightenment:

How Enlightenment thinkers believed government should work:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

DIRECTIONS

Read about your assigned Enlightenment Thinker

Complete the slide for your Enlightenment thinker:

What was their belief about government?

Summarize their main points

Bold any key terms or phrases associated with that belief

Insert an image or icon that represents that Enlightenment thinkers’ views about government.

THOMAS HOBBES

(see shared slidedeck for groups) →

JOHN LOCKE

(see shared slidedeck for groups) →

BARON DE MONTESQUIEU

(see shared slidedeck for groups) →

JEAN JACQUES ROUSSEAU

(see shared slidedeck for groups) →

Make a copy of the shared slidedeck template and link your slidedeck to this slide on Pear Deck using the Website tool!

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Web Slide.

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

What Would the Philosophers Think?

Read the scenario. Choose one philosopher who would agree with the scenario and one who would disagree. Explain why you think they would agree or disagree.

The President should be able to make any laws that he or she thinks is a good idea.

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Explain why:

Explain why:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

What Would the Philosophers Think?

Read the scenario. Choose one philosopher who would agree with the scenario and one who would disagree. Explain why you think they would agree or disagree.

Whatever the majority decides should be enforced on everyone.

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Explain why:

Explain why:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

What Would the Philosophers Think?

Read the scenario. Choose one philosopher who would agree with the scenario and one who would disagree. Explain why you think they would agree or disagree.

If I don’t like what you’re doing, it’s my right to stop you.

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Explain why:

Explain why:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

What Would the Philosophers Think?

Read the scenario. Choose one philosopher who would agree with the scenario and one who would disagree. Explain why you think they would agree or disagree.

The people should have the right to say whatever they want, whenever they want.

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Hobbes

Locke

Montesquieu

Rousseau

circle one

Explain why:

Explain why:

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Drawing Slide

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

Review with Quizizz!

REVIEW Enlightenment Thinkers

🍐 This is a Pear Deck Web Slide.

🍐 To edit the type of question, go back to the "Ask Students a Question" in the Pear Deck sidebar.

https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/5f8352644ef053001e4d6d02/enlightenment-thinkers

The Enlightenment [Pear Deck] (shared)
Info
Tags Teaching, Teaching materials, Philosophy, History, Enlightenment, PearDeck
Type Google Slide
Published 16/07/2021, 12:15:03

Resources

Which Are You Today
Coding Resource Collection
Directory of Mathematical Headaches
English Class Teaching Materials - A1 Beginners
2021 March Mammal Madness K5 Info Slides
World History Lessons (Responses)
An introduction to thermodynamics
Getting Started with Teaching with Minecraft on the Chromebook